Tip | Managing Disk Usage

Many people nowadays have financial conditions to buy an SSD with at least 500Gb, but it still very expensive with prices starting from $350,00 (USD)…

So, probably people are still using SSDs with 120Gb or 260Gb, and, for this specific sizes, it may be very difficult to manage the disk usage…

As it’s very fast, obviously, we will use it as target disk to install our OS, but, depending on the user/usage, for example, people who work with Video Editing, Image Editing, 3D Modeling, etc.., 260Gb is nothing…

We have Fusion Drive but you may loose performance very fast, and also, for Hackintosh users, it may be a bit tricky to maintain…

So, what we could do? Well, there are some workarounds…

1. Move your Home (User) folder to another drive.

Yes, it’s possible and pretty easy… Just make the following steps;

1a. Go to System Preferences > Users & Groups, CONTROL+MouseClick (right mouse click) under the target user, click Advanced Options and change Home directory path to its new location…

New Home Folder
1b. Reboot for the changes take effect.

2. Do you really take advantage of the Sleep feature?

With a regular HDD, putting the machine to Sleep/Hibernate instead of Power Off will save a lot of time to boot the OS again, but, in my opinion, using a SSD, this is completely unnecessary nowadays…

Background: Always, before the system enter in Hibernation/Sleep mode, it may save the contents of the RAM to the disk in order to recover the system state after wake from Hibernation/Sleep, this file will be called sleepimage

The sleepimage file has a size that matches you RAM size, so, if your RAM size is 4Gb, sleepimage also will have 4Gb, if RAM 8Gb sleepimage 8Gb and so on…

To remove the file and prevent its recreation, make he following steps;

2a. Set the system’s Hibernation Mode to 0, this will make the system snapshot be saved only to RAM in case you or someone puts the machine to sleep by mistake, to make this, run the command below at Terminal.app

sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0

2b. Run the following command to check if the change was correctly applied…

pmset -g | grep hibernatemode

You must see the following output…

hibernatemode 0

2c. Run the following commands, each line at once followed by RETURN (Enter), to delete the original sleepimage, create a blank “fake” sleepimage file, and make it unchangeable…

sudo rm -rf /private/var/vm/sleepimage

sudo touch /private/var/vm/sleepimage

sudo chflags uchg /private/var/vm/sleepimage

3. Need even more space?

If you still need space you can create Symbolic Links for some folders from another HFS+ (Hierarchical File System Plus) drive to your main drive…

I’ll give you an example…

3a. Create a folder called Apps2 at your secondary disk…

3b. CONTROL+MouseClick (right mouse click) under the folder and click Make Alias

Make Alias

3c. Move the just created “Apps2 alias” file to your Applications folder…

3d. Rename the file “Apps2 alias” at the Applications folder to “Apps2”

3e. Drag all Applications that AREN’T system applications to the “Apps2” link…

NOTE: You can do the same as above using only a simple command at Terminal.app

ln -s /Volumes/SUPPORT_DISK/Apps2 /Applications/Apps2

I hope this information may make you have a better use of your disk space…

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